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? st. paul tells us you are the body of cryings. the people of god, the mystical body, the church is the body of christ. well, i've noticed it was odd that's hardly referred to the fact that he didn't believe that that was the case, and he said it frequently and emphatically. i talked to peter brown, the great expert, and he was told by catholics that oh, august teen -- augustine believed it, but he believed in the early code of the church, which existed, but never applied to what was given out at the agape meal. it applied to the creed, especially. when you were prepared for baptism, you learned the creed by heart. you were forbidden to write it down or to say it out loud anywhere where a nonbaptized person could hear it. that was the innermost secret of the faith, the creed. as i explored it more and more, there's a line of people in the middle ages kind of forgotten now for very good reason, they all had the view that's not really the literal body and blood, and i began to wonder why why do we never hear about the people? we didn't because they were condemned, but nonetheless,
are not against any entries. >> host: we've been talking with max paul friedman, "rethinking anti-americanism" a history of an exceptional concept in american foreign relations. here's the cover of the book published by cambridge university press. you're watching booktv on c-span 2. >> we have to take back the media. independent and you will save us. the most powerful institutions on earth. more powerful than any bomb. more power than any missile is an idea that explodes onto the scene. but it doesn't happen but it contained by that box, the tv screen that we allocate that are so many hours a week. we need to be able to hear people speaking for themselves outside the box. we can't afford the status quo and a more from global warring to global warming. >> other generations data we adapt, how to remove, how do we go forward in this fast-paced world? the millennial speak at all in stride because that's the reality of how we grew up and it's also private use and adapt ability. the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredibl
the tv on c-span 2. >> next, max paul friedman on his book "rethinking anti-americanism." >> host: professor max paul friedman, author of "rethinking anti-americanism," why do they hate us? >> guest: that's a good question. americans have been asking that the since 1899 as they discovered that looking at old copies of "the new york times." we asked it to 20th century and as it turns out first of all they don't hate us if we think about world opinions. the united states and fight since he said the event of scientific polling in the 1920s and 3
. as i say i'm particularly pleased to be able to speak of a great irishman paul of dwyer on many occasions as a new yorker who was a battler for the underdogs and outsiders. he never forgot where he came from improved it on so many occasions. i want to say a few words on the issue, on the cause of something that is so close to our hearts and people around the world which is our democracy. i am personally honored that the george washington university should be -- bestowed upon me making democracy -- and i do appreciate that. was it not george washington who said perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages. here in the united states and in ireland we have the privilege and indeed on too many occasions to many people take our democracy for granted. and it is precisely because we do have democracy that makes our duty to all those countries and all those peoples struggling to achieve and to assert their democratic rights and make them all the more urgent and indeed all the more sacred. as they struggle to achieve and to assert their democratic rights in many different locati
to the component was paul horowitz. his equal and intellectual in love of the good fight to the impromptu discussions often ended in shouting matches between the two. a hot topic in the lunchroom debate was cuba and the leader fidel castro who had come to power in 1959. most students saw castro as a romantic revolutionary bringing economic and social justice to his people. elite viewed him as another standard issue communist dictator. angela davis, mr. protagonist, was in the class of 1961. the class included robert deniro for a time. his parents were artists that lived in the village, and kathy that later became involved in the 1981 brinks robbery in which a guard and two policemen were killed and served many years in prison for that. angela grew up in birmingham alabama at the height of jim crow, and to escape from the wretched segregated school system, she entered on her junior year in a scholarship in the service committee and i will just read a short passage about her. when she entered the school although angela braced herself for outright hostility, she hadn't foreseen her posts ten
it to paul stevens. he was on the list photography be sent be sent to president ford of possibilities. but heavy quit combat the nation as a whole would've suffered. so he stayed in office, in the sg's office. he was so determined not to benefit that he turned down an opportunity to be appointed as attorney general. he turned down the chance to work from the attorney general smart aleck in office. he avoided the attorney general's private dining room and even turned down the attorney general chauffeur limousine or the time he was acting attorney general. i can't say much more about those times. they occupied the last six month of 1973 united not arrive until may 1974. but everything bob bork says in his book he set in 1974. richardson, ruckelshaus and the people who work with him most closely then such as admin kitchen keith jones tell the same story. and bork's narration is entirely consistent with the man i knew for 40 years. intellectual, considering consequences before acting and absolutely honest. he's also the funniest man i ever met. that didn't come through in his 1987 hearing
productive as a government. surely we can agree on that. surely w we can't maintain, as mr. paul krugman did, unless he's advising the democratic majority in the senate, that even wasteful defense department spending shouldn't be cut, because we want to stimulate the economy. with borrowed money? throwing money at programs that are not -- no good? that's no way to do business. steny hoyer, one of the democratic leaders in the house, says, "does the country have a spending problem? the country has a paying-for problem." we don't pay enough, mr. hoyer says. mr. hoyer says we need to pay more to washington so washington can keep spending. we're not changing here. it's the american people's fault. don't you know that we are investing for you? give us more money so we can invest. yodon't you think all these programs work? aren't they doing great? no, we're he not going to reform them. we can't cut a single one. children will be thrown into the streets. old people won't have drugs or health care. all of this because of a modest reduction in the growth of spending? congressman ryan has demonstra de
to you a little bit one of the things in the book, around expulsion and suspension and you have paul tuft's book, talking about noncognitive variables and their importance on achievement. can you talk about the role of a curriculum and either in terms of how limited it is here or what it should be in terms of addressing all the needs of a child of significant needs of children. >> sure. i do think the way that the landscape of schools has evolved here over time -- and not really because of anybody's bad intentions or deliberate oversight. there's sort of one model of school that is particularly prevalent, and that is a very highly structured environment, this very focused on core subjects and academic remediation and getting kids to the point where they can pass the state standardized tests and good on to college. i think there are a number of schools doing absolutely amazing work, a wonderful job with kids and a number of kids that thrive in those environments. but i feel like unless we have sort of a more diverse kind of ecosystem of different schools and approaches, it's going to be ha
and others so she was a pretty good domestic president. i talked to a guy named paul musgrave who said in the first three or four months of the presidency it was like a golden age if you go back and look at it again it's amazing. all the stuff is going on, new policies and ideas, and the public pieces, john osborn wrote for the watch and said the domestic policy meetings they sit around for hours laughing it and there on a whole different side of mixing. then it all stopped. he stopped. he lost interest. >> that is what makes him such a puzzle. >> i'm not suggesting that you are doing this but i was watching on c-span some clips from nixon's state of the union address. again, i am not suggesting this is a way of becoming healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of the water. he said it and he was proud of it publicly, and yet on the tapes you have him grousing about it not once or twice, but constantly, identify and environmentalism with liberals saying that we have made
chairman paul ryan has even said that it doesn't really matter how their budget eliminates the deficit. mr. president, americans across our country who will feel the impact of the choices we make in the coming weeks and months feel that it does matter. so while some of my republican colleagues would probably prefer not to hear about it, i think that the impact of the house republican budget is a crucial part of this debate, and we owe it to the american people to put our opinions on the record. now we've come a long way, mr. president, but there are still far too many americans today who are unemployed or underemployed, which is why our senate budget's first priority is boosting our economic recovery. speaker boehner has actually agreed with president obama that our debt does not present -- quote -- "an immediate crisis." so you might think the house budget would phase in cuts responsibly so we can protect our fragile recovery. well, instead the house republican budget would do serious damage to job creation and job growth and doubles down on the harmful cuts from sequestration which the n
think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. so what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the $600 billion tax increase that obama won in january and the trillion dollars of obamacare tax increases that most americans are unaware of, they don't know that they're hitting, they haven't gotten a lot of press attention, obama never talks about the trillion dollars of tax increases starting this year for obamacare. so 1.6 plus 1.5, that's a $3 trillion dollar tax increase over the next decade if the democratic budget passed. and, of course, it never balances because they turn around and spend another, um, more money, hundreds of billions more on stimulus programs as well as other stuff. so they do more spending with more taxes. what the ryan budget does and why i think it's very interesting for the republican future is that it reform
have been talking with max paul friedman rethinking anti-americanism the history of an exceptional contact in american foreign relations. here is the cover of the book published by cambridge university press you are watching booktv on c-span2. >>> next on book tv "after words" with guest host this week msnbc host se cupp. david burstein and his book fast future how the millennials generation is shaping the world in and he argues those come between 18 to 30 years of age are the largest generation in u.s. history and more ethnically diverse and visually tune in the matters mr. burstein says millennials are increasingly more influential in a fast-moving more integrated world. the program lasts about an hour. sort of advising the town elders about the issues of the generation and that begs background. first how old are you? >> guest: i am 24. >> host: where did you go to school, grow up and feel compelled to write this? >> guest: i grew up in connecticut about an hour outside of new york city as a student in high school started a film festival and we saw the first coming in about young
budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the 600 million-dollar tax increase that obama won in january and they trillion dollars of obamacare tax increases that most americans are unaware of and they don't know that they are getting and obama never talks about the trillion dollars in tax increases starting this year for obamacare. 1.6 and 1.5 is a 3 trillion-dollar tax increase over the next decade if the democratic budget passes and a never balances because they turn round and spend another -- hundreds of millions of dollars more on stimulus programs as well as other stuff. they do more spending with more taxes but with the brian budget does is very interesting for the republican future. it reforms entitlement, protect
principle. taken back. i said this is in our math classes? in my public high school outside of chicago, paul krugman wrote our economics textbook. he writes a majority of the economics textbooks in this country. so it's so important that we reach out to our younger audiences and fight back against this progressive aggression into our schools which makes me so excited to introduce our next speaker. calista gingrich is writing children's books that teach american values, capitalism and history the right way, not the liberal, doctored way. it's so important that we reach out to our young people using even chored illustrations. if they can't read, read to them. because if we don't teach them history, the liberals will for us, and do you want the liberals teaching your children history? >> no! >> so, ladies and gentlemen, i'm honored to introduce calista gingrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> thank you. thank you, charlie, and thank you for that warm welcome. it's great to be here at the 40th annual cpac conference. ever since the first conference in 1973, cpac has been a gathering of ideas, activists,
and political ally paul ryan, tirelessly barn stormed the country in an effort to recruit and promote candidates, push the party message and earn votes with ticket-topper mitt romney. then came last november. remys did hold on to the u.s. house of representatives and majority of gubernatorial seats among other win, yet given the fiery and sometimes ugly blame game, mr. priebus might have been wished for the days he was recognized as a rising star all while taking the republican party by storm. he's been working on campaigns since he was 16 and wound through the wisconsin republican party ranks and up to the rnc. he is proud to be a lifelong green pay packers fan. -- green bay packers fan. we're told he played a mean game of softball during his time working on his law degree at the university of miami. a time to reflect and look forward happens in any party that loses, but it doesn't lessen the sting when you're the recipient. mr. priebus has been working on a way to rally the faithful and plot a new strategy for the midterm election in 2014 and presidential contest in 2016. one of the silver lin
. the republican-led house, by contrast, senator paul ryan and his team has a plan that they'll vote on today that has passed -- will balance the budget. and they've passed a budget every year. and our colleagues in the sena senate, while refusing to pass a budget, have delighted in complaining about the leadership and the responsible action of the house by blaming everything they can think of and more on unkind paul ryan, who wants to push old fox off the cliff. and that's not true. he's got good plans. he's got growth plans. but what i -- i would say to you is, this congress, this senate has done nothing while being critical of everyone else. last year, there -- we've had several budgets come up and i voted for several of them. my democratic colleagues have voted for not one. they have voted against the ryan budget. they voted against the president's budget. they voted against the toomey budget. they voted against the rand paul budget. voted against them all. but yet they don't seem to be in the least bit hesitant just to attack everybody else. so i think we have a moral duty to balance the
lunch with paul ryan. for the reasons we don't understand is ronald reagan would of done that, george bush would have done that and for the country to be successful we have to put aside some of this vitriol that exists and begin to recognize it just because the other side doesn't have our view it doesn't mean that they are not motivated for love of country. we have to get to a different place where we can find a broad consensus based on principles. that's how we will win. ronald reagan for me is someone that is a role model not because of his great success. she is certainly that but also a role model for the political system that we have today. imagine a country with the energy resources that we have with the immigrant heritage that we have that has been our blessing. with the ability to solve the problems that seem intractable today. this country will take off. this country will be the inspiration for the rest of the world. we will regain or footing and rebuild the greatest country on the face of the earth and requires the kind of leadership that ronald reagan showed each and every d
of paul. -- hall''. tonight will be much more civil than that but to give you a sense of continuity of the history here coming it is most fitting lee it will come the most honorable mary robinson the former un high commissioner to cooper union and president of ireland. her career is devoted to the pursuit of fairness in all aspects of society. as an activist lawyer she defended the causes of women that were marginalized as a member of the irish senate she promoted progressive legislation including the legalization of contraception for the president robinson has been the honorary president and is a member of the elders 11 independent group leaders brought together by mandela to offer collective experience to promote the -- peace building and to promote the shared interest of humanity. in 2009 obama awarded the presidential medal of freedom calling an advocate for the hungry and hunted and be forgotten and ignored. mary robinson it has not only showed a light on human suffering but those for a better future for the world. in her book "everybody matters" my life giving voice" really se
. [applause] examples, examples like senator rand paul -- [cheers and applause] congressman louie gohmert. [cheers and applause] and a few steadfast, stalwart, principled fighters on capitol hill. and we have unselfish americans around this country. examples like our warriors in wisconsin who have been on the front lines fighting -- [inaudible] [applause] examples like michael -- [inaudible] jo ann terry -- [inaudible] who helped coordinate our efforts to defend representative democracy in their state as governor scott walker stood and acted on principle. [cheers and applause] one patriot stood at a town hall and challenged president obama questioning his demonization of the tea party. it's no surprise that this principled fighter, ryan rhodes, is from iowa. [applause] there's another iowan, congressman steve king -- [applause] who challenges president obama and nancy pelosi on capitol hill and defends the tea party. and for this karl rove threatened to primary him. >> boo! >> tea party patriots gave cindy pew the nickname sunshine cindy because she is one of the most cheerful, happy patr
newscast, "this week with george stephanopoulos," and i had the opportunity to debate paul krugman. you know paul krugman. and in the course of this debate, i made what i thought was a pretty basic statement. i said, you know, when we think about the health of the u.s. economy, we have to remember that a private sector job and a public sector job are not the same things. a private sector job pays for itself. a public sector job is paid for by taxpayers. i thought it was a pretty obvious statement. but later my staff was contacted by a reporter who felt that he needed to fact check this statement. [laughter] seriously. it was interesting to me because it said how little so many people understand what makes the economy go. and i think one of our fundamental issues in this country is we have a lot of people setting policy that impacts our economy, but they don't understand how the economy actually works and the impact of that policy. my second anecdote is this: in a recent poll, fully 70%, 7-0% of small business owners said that they thought the federal government was hostile to them. not
it and if you do, we're going to attack you, paul ryan, because you have a creative, insightful way to preserve medicare and make it more healthy in the future and put it on a sound path, we're going to say you're trying to destroy medicare. he's got a plan to save medicare. bring it into the 21st the -- te 20th century --, 21st century. ought to be discussed openly and fairly, not demonized. that's the level of debate we're in here. so in private we talk to our colleagues and they say yes, we need to make changes, rereally do. well, when? and when the paper is printed, the budget is printed, it's not there. it's not there. so there's no reform of the fundamental drivers of our debt. we also know that last year we spent $750 billion on 83 government social welfare programs, means-tested programs. that is, if your income is below a certain level, the government deems you worthy of subsidy of some kind. now, these 83 programs, many of them are duplicative, there's not a coherent focus to them that endeavors to help the people really other than giving them money. giving them aid. there's not a suf
there was only one sentence on the subject in senator rubio's speech last week, the left's blogosphere from paul krugman on down exploded with rage. idiotic! thoroughly refuted, and the perennial favorite, it's a lie, was the way rubio's comment was characterized. my aei colleague, ed pinto -- who's right here in front of me -- and i were once accused by joe nocera in his new york times column of using the big lie tech meek for suggesting that the government -- technique for suggesting that the government had a major role in the financial crisis. it doesn't get much worse than being compared to joseph goebbels. [laughter] most americans have no idea that there is an alternative view of what caused the financial crisis. the result is an odd gap in public discourse on this issue. as an illustration, when i am interviewed about the financial crisis, i am often asked why no bankers have been sued personally or tried criminally for causing the crisis. i usually respond by saying i don't think that the bankers actually caused the crisis. this appears to interviewers -- to leave these interviewers dumb
, is a demographic and democratic fact. republican vice presidential candidate, paul ryan, you might remember, a couple weeks ago suggested president obama was re-elected on the back urban voters. that's right. the city is blue. not in the narrow sen of being democratic but open, multicull cur, creative, willing to cooperate. it's a good thing. most a bad thing. it's a fact not a political'd yolings. it describes nature of the -- the globe looks ever more like the city and ever less like the rural landscape. the world we live in is multiculture, is connected interdependent. cities which make them ideal representative for today. in embracing the urban has been they is our destiny. we can begin to suspend the cynicism and pessimism about politics. we are liberated to build a -- on the approachial foundation of the ancient city. guided by the blueprint implicit in the mega size modern successors. eurozone is likely to fall apart. the cities are coming together. the united states and china may be paralyzed by the competing sovereignty and the rival abstract ed what american and chinese cities can
's discussion offering an amendment on behalf of myself and senator paul, senator rubio, senator toomey, senator mcconnell that will redirect the $14.5 billion we spend on behalf of 11 million children, and this is the way we would do it. we would simply pin $1,300 and be their share of that money, each of those children, and let the money follow the child to the school they attend, any accredited school, public or private. now, here's the problem. in a contentious washington world this is a problem that seems to have a broad amount of agreement from the left and from the right. this $14.5 billion, which is appropriated expressly to help these 11 million children, isn't getting to them. it's ending up other places. it's distributed by a complicated federal forel la that's generally -- formula that's generally based on the number low-incom of low-income n a district and the average per-pupil expenditure in a state. here's what happens. what happens the money largely follows the teachers' salaries, and to get right to the bottom line, the children in wealthier districts are usually taught by teach
brand paul and they will do great work in this recovery in particular. the key question after storm like this is weather was in aberration or a harbinger of things to come. a few short readers to go hurricanes along the north eastern half of east coast were relatively uncommon. hurricane sandy is the third major hurricane to threaten or strike the northeast coast in the last three years. hurricane irene devastated parts of east coast in 2011 and the year before that hurricane earl was a major threat. unfortunately the northeast midland and other volatile areas are expected to see more frequent and larger storms like sandy in the future. just this year just last month in fact the government accountability office at the new area to its high-risk list and the impact change the federal government. gao explained among other things climate change could support the threatened costs coastal areas of agriculture productivity increasing in tent city and frequency of severe weather events. gao also argued that the federal government is not prepared to do with the impacts of climate change and recom
that will bring about a generational change that will be very hoped we. marco rubio, paul ryan, alisa to, bobby jindal. a very clear shift moving forward. one other thing is his numbers have been rising pretty dramatically and i'm pretty sure 50% is not upside down and i suspect to see that with governors as well. >> comcast chairman and ceo brian roberts spoke at the economic club of washington. robert sarver founded comcast in 1963 feet condition for the future of the media to elegy industry. this is 50 minute. [inaudible conversations] >> can i get your attention, please. attach them, please. [inaudible conversations] everybody, please says. thank you very much. special guests brian roberts is the chairman and ceo of comcast. comcast is a comp me which is now a market capitalization of $107.63 billion of revenue and about $20 billion of earnings. a very credible company and story will talk about for a moment. the company was started in 1963 when brian's father bought a come to me in tupelo. that is for others presley was born. but it's better known now as the place where comcast was born. co
. well, paul ryan repeals but he doesn't replace. and you know what? we don't need to have it replaced. we need to keep the affordable care act in place, moving america in the right direction and helping health care be affordable both to families and to business. we cannot allow the ryan budget to stand. but just being against an idea isn't good enough. and this is why we support the murray -- the murray budget, because she preserves the affordable care act and she continues to emphasize those reforms that we made in quality and prevention and integrateive services. we know how through those quality initiatives we can save money and save lives. others will also speak about medicare. i cannot believe that we're going to replace medicare with a voucher. a voucher and a promise. so let's get rid of -- not deal with the health care needs of the elderly, let's get rid of the financial needs of the federal government. so we'd rather protect billionaires than protect senior citizens. i think we've got our priorities wrong. others will speak to medicare. i want to go to medicaid. and i want to
exactly who her, but there were several there, invited to speak with rumsfeld, paul, and rice. i remember asking him, and i was conscious of that that evening when i saw the beginning of the war. i ask them to sell certain argue that the iraqis have these weapons of mass direction. and the answer for all three of them was its of the question of tosser we are. we know why they have them. that impressed me because these people lead known for a long time. would you say you know the summit has something it means to me you know. this other question a probability but a statement of certain to cause a -- statement of certitude. still occurred to me to pursue the subject. i asked him if you know that they have weapons of mass destruction, what is the order for the use and particularly nuclear weapons? because obviously if they have them and they're ready to use them, authorizing either divisional commanders or brigade commanders or whoever else to have the possibility to execute the initiation and their use. and here the answer was perplexing. they said to we don't know. about the surprising busi
, thune number 307, warner 693, thune 307, sanders 198, burr 697, reed of rhode island, number 482, paul 263, landrieu 314, cornyn 247, menendez 606, vitter 689, tester 537, toomey 535, casey 442, coats 514, cardin 273, lee 373, that there be no second-degree amendments in order prior to the votes in relation to any of these amendments, that notwithstanding all time having expired on the resolution, there be two minutes equally divided prior to each vote. upon disposition of the lee amendment number 373, the majority have the next amendment in order and all these votes be ten-minute votes, and the chair report en bloc. the presiding officer: is there objection? mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i believe this is a good list and would support this list. i would advise that a number of senators have amendments that they have waited patiently on and are entitled to get votes on, so we need to move forward, and the more effectively we can do so, the sooner we can finish, but there are some real serious matters that have not yet been p
bar rough so 184, paul 382, vitter 526, vitter 338, cruz 471, cruz 702, lee 673, lee 521, coburn 414, coburn 416, coburn 709, port man 154, leahy 710, a side by side to senator inhofe 139 and inhofe number 139. there be no second-degree amendments in relation to these amendments, none be divisible, notwithstanding all time having expired, there be two minutes equally divided rye to each vote and all votes be 10-minute votes upon disposition of is 39, the senate proceed to immediately vote on adoption of s. con. res. 8 as amended. the presiding officer: is there objection? a senator: reserving the right to object, i will not object mr. menendez: i do want our colleagues to understand that some of these amendments that the chairlady just asked to be put in order are incredibly fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interests in international organizations. that's what some of these amendments will to. and you don't do it in a budget process. do yo
. paul harvey, who got his start in broadcasting in montana, said it best in this poem, "so god made a farmer." "god looked down on the earth he created and said i need a caretaker for this world i made. and so god made a farmer. so as part of trying to bridge that divide between washington, d.c. and montana, i honor the strong legacy of farming and ranching montanans in montana by celebrating national ag day. those montana families involved in agriculture is so much more than a livelihood. it is a way of life. i'm honored to represent so many ranchers, so many farmers from montana who have dedicated their life to the land, providing the service that everyone in the world benefits from. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kansas. mr. moran: mr. president, thank you. the bill that we are debating, the so-called continuing resolution, spends slightly more than $1 trillion between now and the end of the fiscal year. and as those who were either on the floor or watching a few moments ago discovered, the opportunity to amend this bill in ev
offer this amendment on behalf of senator paul and myself with senator toomey and mcconnell cosponsoring. it's designed to help 11 million low-income children in this country. we appropriate $14.5 billion every year through our title 1 federal funding. it's supposed to go to them but it doesn't get there. that's agreed upon by both the left and the right. for example, marguerite rosa writing for the center for american progress says that the difference between school expenditures is often substantial and she pointed out that the money goes to schools where teachers are paid more but the children aren't necessarily the poor children. and so the poorer children, the ones we intend to help, are left in schools with less money. sometimes the money can add up to quite a bit. the same analysis is then found by the forwardham foundation, i would say that's a center-right organization because of the federal formula we use. so --. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mr. alexander: let the money follow the child to the school, whether it's public or private and i thank the presi
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